The Problem with “Social Progress”: LGBT History Should Teach Us To Challenge The Present, Not Assume Everything Is Sorted

Inspired by responses to the recent National Theatre Live production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Adam Kirkbride contemplates the dangers that arise when we assume the problems of the past are no longer visited upon the present.

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Seven Books to Buy on National #BookshopDay!

  • By Charlotte Stevenson

As some of you might know, this Saturday is National Bookshop Day. This means that across the weekend, specifically October 8th, there will be lots of book related events going on across the country such as author readings, signings and such. It’s an occasion to show your local bookshop some love as, whilst Amazon is convenient and easy to access online, there is nothing like going for a browse at your local store. There is a community there, a tangible hum to all of those spines full of potential calling out ‘pick me’. Every penny we spend there goes towards keeping those sanctuaries in place and making sure they remain on our high streets for the long run.

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‘beyond all imagination’. holocaust memorial day and writing the incomprehensible

By Charlotte Stevenson

Current student Charlotte Stevenson reflects on the recent screening of Night and Fog for Holocaust Memorial Day and on her reading of Rena’s Promise for the module Conflicting Words, commenting on the tension between the necessity of commemoration and impossibility of writing about the unimaginable.  Continue reading “‘beyond all imagination’. holocaust memorial day and writing the incomprehensible”

words matter review: house of leaves

By Adam Cummins

‘This is not for you.’

So begins 2000’s House of Leaves. Why do I give the year and not the author? Because the author of House of Leaves is deliberately hard to find, much like the text itself. Where does the text begin and end? Who writes, and who reads? House of leaves is ergodic literature at its finest, and it might just be the most disturbing thing you’ll ever read. Continue reading “words matter review: house of leaves”