Brighton Fiction Prize

Brighton’s only short fiction prize.
1st prize £1,000. Short, flash and local awards.
Visit us at www.brightonprize.com @BrightonPrize
International entries. Open until 30th June 2017
Judges – authors Sally O’Reilly, Erinna Mettler and Myriad Editions’ Candida Lacey

CLINIC POETS AT PICA STUDIOS, YORK

CLINIC POETS AT PICA STUDIOS, YORK

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

7:00pm doors for 7.30pm start.

PICA, Artist-led Studios, 7A Grape Lane, YO1 7HU

Poetry press Clinic brings poets Rebecca Tamás and Edward Doegar to York to read from their publications, Savage and For Now, published with clinic in Spring 2017, along with guest Ágnes Lehóczky.

Rebecca Tamás is a London based poet, working towards a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at The University of East Anglia. Her poetry pamphlet, The Ophelia Letters, was published by Salt in 2013, and she has most recently had work in The White Review, Best British Poetry 2015, A Poem for Every Year and The Suburban Review. Rebecca’s pamphlet Savage, will be published by Clinic in March, and she is currently working on poems about witchcraft, occult female alterity and ecological language. You can find her on twitter @RebTamas.

Edward Doegar’s poems, reviews and translations have appeared in various magazines including Poetry Review, Granta (online), Prac Crit and Poetry London. He is a fellow of the Complete Works and a consulting editor at The Rialto. His pamphlet, For Now, will be published by clinic in March.

Ágnes Lehóczky is a poet, scholar and translator originally from Budapest. Her poetry collections published in the UK are Budapest to Babel (Egg Box Publishing, 2008), Rememberer (Egg Box Publishing, 2012) and Carillonneur (Shearsman Books, 2014). She also has three poetry collections in Hungarian: ikszedik stáció(Universitas, 2000), Medalion (Universitas, Budapest, 2002) and Palimpszeszt (Magyar Napló, Budapest, 2015). She currently works as a lecturer and teaches creative writing at the University of Sheffield. Her pamphlet, Pool Epitaphs and Other Love Letters, will published by Boiler House Press in 2017 and her new full collection Swimming Pool by Shearsman also in 2017.pica

This is a White Rose College of Arts and Humanities Student-Led Forum event.

Poetry at PICA STUDIOS

Clinic Presents Poetry at PICA STUDIOS

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 7:00pm 9:00pm

PICA Studios, 7A Grape Lane, York. YO1 7HU

Event page here!

Poetry press Clinic brings two exciting young poets Rebecca Tamás and Edward Doegar to York to read from their new publications, Savage and For Now, along with Ágnes Lehóczky

Rebecca Tamás is a London based poet, working towards a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at The University of East Anglia. Her poetry pamphlet, The Ophelia Letters, was published by Salt in 2013, and she has most recently had work in The White Review, Best British Poetry 2015, A Poem for Every Year and The Suburban Review. Rebecca’s pamphlet Savage, will be published by Clinic in March, and she is currently working on poems about witchcraft, occult female alterity and ecological language. You can find her on twitter @RebTamas.

Edward Doegar’s poems, reviews and translations have appeared in various magazines including Poetry Review, Granta (online), Prac Crit and Poetry London. He is a fellow of the Complete Works and a consulting editor at The Rialto. His pamphlet, For Now, will be published by clinic in March.

Ágnes Lehóczky is a poet, scholar and translator originally from Budapest. Her poetry collections published in the UK are Budapest to Babel (Egg Box Publishing, 2008), Rememberer (Egg Box Publishing, 2012) and Carillonneur (Shearsman Books, 2014). She also has three poetry collections in Hungarian: ikszedik stáció(Universitas, 2000), Medalion (Universitas, Budapest, 2002) and Palimpszeszt (Magyar Napló, Budapest, 2015). She was the winner of the Arthur Welton Poetry Award 2010 and the inaugural co-winner of the Jane Martin Prize for Poetry at Girton College, Cambridge, in 2011. Her pamphlet, Pool Epitaphs and Other Love Letters, will published by Boiler House Press in 2017 and her new full collection Swimming Pool by Shearsman also in 2017.

Crime and Adventure on the Railways

Keep your eyes peeled over the next few weeks for some suspense-filled mystery stories by third-year Creative Writing students on the National Railway Museum website. The students all participated in a collaborative project with the museum last semester as part of their Writing Genres module. They learnt all about the long history of crime and adventure stories with train and railway settings.

crime and adventure

As you can read at http://blog.nrm.org.uk/ their stories all drew on this history: the possibilities of the ‘locked room’ of the train carriage, the potential for the criminal to hide and escape, the anxieties of being trapped with strangers, and all the things that can be done with a carriage key…

The stories will be published at fortnightly intervals from this week onward to coincide with the museums Crime and Adventure season. read the stories, visit the museum and be inspired to add to this genre yourself.

 

 

Words and Whippets

Words & Whippets featuring Kate Fox

25th April 2016, York Theatre Royal, 7.45, £7

Since 2013, Words & Whippets has proudly paraded a showcase of the finest Northern-bred poets.  Each year we select some of the finest spoken word artists to perform their unique styles and give a platform to the northern voice.  Joining us this year is stand-up poet Kate Fox, previous Poet-In-Residence for both the Great North Run and Glastonbury Festival.  Kate has dominated the airwaves, appearing on BBC 1, & 2 and Radio 3 showcasing her funny, warm and heartfelt poetry.  Plus Andy Bennett, Hannah Davies and Katie Greenbrown.

Guest Speaker Rachel Conway from Georgina Capel Agency

On Tuesday March 28th students on the Publishing, Production and Performance module attended a lecture by guest speaker Rachel Conway from Georgina Capel Agency in London. In this session, Georgina discussed the inner world and workings of a smaller agency such as Capel in relation to the bigger publishing houses of the UK, including topics of how these smaller agencies work to deliver the best overall contract and negotiations for their clients in relation to those larger houses.

Rachel Conway

Rachel Conway

What became very noticeable from Rachel’s talk, was how inclusive and expansive these smaller in-house agencies are, and just how much they can provide for both younger authors and writers, but also to the more experienced who are looking for a genuine connection with an agent who can provide them with the best options for their next move in their career. Perhaps the most interesting point was the stress placed on the actual relationship between the writer and the agent, with Rachel placing immeasurable value on the time and energy which is spent between the moment a manuscript is initial submitted to a company such as the Capel Agency, and the subsequent release of the work.

The talk, provided a much-needed insight into the dark and mysterious world of agencies, with Rachel discussing a wide array of topics including how the client must be aware of how competitive the marketplace is but also understanding the time that is required in order to make a work ready to fight in that ring.

Furthermore, the discussion from Creative Writing Subject Director Abi Curtis provided the authorial side of the publishing coin. With students being able to see how a manuscript adapts from the initial idea, to the submitted novel and then gets put through several months of rigorous editing and promotion in order to make sure that it is given a fair chance at being both a critical and commercial success in the fierce marketplace.

Overall this session provided students with the necessary information to show that they need not submit to a larger publishing house in order to become ‘the next big thing’. In fact, it placed specific truth that often times the smaller companies are able to dedicate a more specified relationship between the work, the author, editor and the agency. This was a fantastic session and one from which a lot was learnt.

This post was written by the Promotions Team on the 2nd year BA (Hons) Creative Writing module Publishing, Production and Performance.  

Anthology Launch/Showcase Rehearsal

Last night in Quad South Hall, Creative Writing students from the Events Team on the 2nd year Publishing, Production and Performance module ran a rehearsal ahead of next week’s launch/student Showcase. Members of the Showcase Curatorial Team were also there to offer last minute input.

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The Events and Curatorial Teams prepare for the run-through.

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A reader rehearses.

 

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Checking tech with Richard Lawrence

With the help of technical staff member Richard Lawrence, students did a run-through with the evening’s performers and finalized room set-up plans.

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Room set-up planning

 

Next week promises to be a wonderful occasion to celebrate Creative Writing at YSJ. Students have written all content for the event, and students have promoted, curated, and planned the evening. Book your free ticket here!

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March 28 Set-list

 

 

Beyond the Walls Anthology Launch & Student Showcase

On March 28 at the York Literature Festival, YSJ Creative Writing students will launch the 2017 Beyond the Walls anthology and host a series of readings showcasing YSJ writing talent.

The anthology and showcase are edited and curated by 2nd year BA Creative Writing students.

On the night you can obtain your free copy of the anthology as well as two beautiful Broadsides featuring work by two Showcase readers. This year’s anthology cover is designed by BA Design student Ellen Shaw. The Broadsides were designed by BA Design student Andrew Kukk.

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Cover of the 2017 Beyond the Walls anthology

 

The event has been planned and promoted by 2nd year BA Creative Writing students and includes refreshments. Book your free ticket here!

An Evening with Sameer Rahim of Prospect Magazine

On Monday 27th February students on the Publishing, Production and Performance module attended a session with guest speaker Sameer Rahim, a reviewer for the Telegraph, and Arts and Book Editor for Prospect. During the session, Sameer delivered informative insight into the literary industry, and gave some valuable guidance to students looking to work in that line of business.

YSJ Creative Writing Lecturer Kimberly Campanello interviews Sameer Rahim in our class session

Lecturer Kimberly Campanello interviews Sameer Rahim in our class session

 Career Trajectory:

Sameer fell into literary journalism as an editor for the student newspaper during his studies at Cambridge. He went on to teach, and then worked on the Oxford English Dictionary; he looked through English words derived from Arabic and Persian, checking and correcting them.

Fact: The next Oxford Dictionary will be published in 2037.

After several stints in various professions, Sameer sent out letters looking for work and valuable experience. For a year, he interned at the London Review of Books (LRB). During his internship, he developed his editorial skills to a high standard; as a fact-checker, he had to read each written piece carefully. He revealed how the editorial process produces a very different finished piece from what was originally put forward. An editor can do a lot to help a writer develop their craft during this process. Sameer pointed out that using as few words as possible is the best way to write; clarity and structure are important features of good work.

Fact: Sameer went to Syria after his internship at the London Review of Books for six months and studied Arabic.

Sameer went on to review for companies like The Sunday Times and London Review of Books. He then got a job at The Telegraph and remained there for seven years before moving on to Prospect as the Arts and Books Editor.

Reviewing for The Telegraph:

The average day consists of receiving up to fifty books a day. From that selection, only fourteen books are reviewed for publication in the ten/twelve pages the public sees. Four reviews are 2500-3000 words long. Each review works to be honest, point out the good as well as the bad, and entertain the mass market readership The Telegraph attracts.

Reviewing for Prospect Magazine:

There is a clear difference between Prospect and The Telegraph and Sameer points this out through his experience with both companies. Reviewing for a monthly magazine enables the texts reviewed to be in-depth and explorative of the ideas highlighted. There are five/six long reviews that consist of 2000-2500 words, followed by eight short reviews each 250 words. The length of these reviews means they must be economical. The magazine centres their reviews on non-fiction texts, not leaving much room for fiction. Two supplements were developed as a result; one is published during the summer, and the other in the winter.

The Cons of the Job:

As Sameer started with the not-so-glamourous technicalities of the job, so shall we. Sameer’s job is one of organisation and time management. There’s a lot of sorting stuff out and making sure others stick to the time schedule, as well as yourself.

If you wanted to work as a reviewer, it’s important that you know exactly who you work for, and that doesn’t mean the name of the business. You have to know your audience. What you write is a reflection of who your work for; there is often an in-house style you will be expected to write in.

The Pros of the Job:

Editing is incredibly fun.

Sameer suggests we probably disagree, but this is where the real writing begins. Moving paragraphs to create structure, line-by-line edits and directing the writer to address these changes results in a distinct and coherent piece that is ready to be published.

Sameer laughed with students about how we should feel in pain if there is a spelling mistake, or a grammatical error: it’s the key to making your work great. Typos are a common mistake, and there is no denying that we all do it. Except there is no excuse. Typos have the ability to colour another person’s view of your character. Readers and editors are likely to assume terrible things – you have a laziness of thought, you haven’t thought about it as much as you might have, or perhaps there’s a lack of pride.

Read, read, and reread your work. That goes for everything.

Advice to Students:

It’s easier than it’s ever been to get in touch with the literary industry. Twitter is a great platform to connect with these individuals. Social media enables you to talk to people you wouldn’t normally be able to meet, and these interactions are visible long after they have ended. It’s a great way to prove your involvement with the literary environment, especially now that we live in a world where our potential employers can check our social media profiles before offering us a job.

Work experience is another great way to get yourself out there and learn hands on about the industry. Whether your spend a few weeks somewhere, or a whole year, you can build contacts with people in-the-know.

Sameer points out that the editor and writer are two separate identities. They are frames of mind you must differentiate between. The editor is unafraid of the work in front of them. They look at words on a page and scribble in margins, crossing out words and sharpening their prose. The writer, however, is controlled by self-doubt; there is an anxiety towards the words they write. It is because of these two mind-sets that it is difficult to be the editor of your own work, and you have to turn that inner-editor off. Seek out people you trust to read your work. The best writers are those who are able to accept the constructive criticism thrown at them. If you struggle with writing, maybe you are dyslexic, don’t let your struggle hold you back. We all need to be edited, even the majestic J.K Rowling.

The literary industry is powered by luck and keen-minded individuals. You should be curious. If you want to specialise in something, go specialise.

Keep going and don’t be discouraged was a theme of the night.

This post was written by the Promotions Team on the 2nd year BA (Hons) Creative Writing module Publishing, Production and Performance.  

Slay on Words

“Slay on Words
@The Habit, Goodramgate
Doors Open at 7pm
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Over at SayOwtSlam HQ a momentous YORK SLAM is brewing; poets representing the University of York, York St John’s and “the community” are sharpening their tongues for a head-to-head around Easter 2017.

Enter Slay On Words II
15 poets from YSJ have 3 minutes each to pour out lines of lyrical genius to our host of randomly selected judges, in order to go forth and represent at the YORK SLAM!

Poets from UoY are in conversation with a few jazz musicians for an experimental little mix up. A jazz and poetry interlude for a cosy slam at the Habit.

Hosted by cool cat named Samra Mayanja

Tickets will be available online and OTD
Up for performing? Email: events@thenorthernyouth.com.”