Leave Earth Behind at the Official Launch of Terra Two, Sept 29th

It is a great time to be a fan of Science Fiction. We’re weeks away from the release of a new Blade Runner movie, Channel 4 are about to debut ‘Electric Dreams’ (a new anthology show adapting the short stories of Philip K. Dick), a brand new iteration of Star Trek is about to drop on Netflix and, of course, next week will see the official launch of York St John University’s very own SF project: ‘Terra Two: An Arc(hive) for Off-World Survival.’ 

The project officially launches on Friday 29 September in Quad South Hall from 6:00 – 7:30 pm.

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Graduate Internship Opportunity: YorkMix

YorkMix Media have been in touch to advertise an internship as Sports, Media and Communications intern. YorkMix writes:

The role is to report on sports across York but predominantly home games for York City FC and York City Knights RLFC. You will also take responsibility for raising the profile of both teams via social media and you will produce copy for news in brief for York TV.

This is a great opportunity to gain experience of sports journalism working alongside two of York’s sports clubs while reporting for YorkMix. You will also have the opportunity to feed into the newly launched York TV. This is a part time role of 28 hours per week over 30 weeks – this is a paid internship.

Interested parties from YSJU’s 2017 graduating class are invited to contact internships@yorksj.ac.uk for more information.

Student Opportunity: Join a Live Reading of the play ‘Volpone’

Adam Smith is looking for performers to help him stage an informal dramatic reading of Ben Jonson’s 1606 play, Volpone, which is to be studied by first year students this semester.

volpone

“This bawdy, provocative and frankly vicious play follows the Machiavellian Volpone and his parasitic side-kick Mosca as they con and connive their way through renaissance Venice. Filled with razor sharp wit and cutting insults, Jonson’s play is and exciting, darkly comic and haunting tale, which I hope you might consider helping me bring to life in Week 5.

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The YSJU Big Summer Read: A Really Radical Mary?

This summer, the York St John Literature programme invited students and staff to read and respond to Colm Tóibín’s 2012 novella The Testament of Mary, a study of the mother of Jesus of Nazareth as she comes to terms with her son’s crucifixion at hands of the Roman Empire. In this post, Chris Maunder critiques Tóibín’s conservatism and points to more radical challenges to the Cult of Mary.


By Chris Maunder

I started this book with some relish. For many years, I have been a researcher of the cult of the Virgin Mary; I have written one book, edited another, written several articles on the topic, and there are more publications to come. I particularly like provocative work about Mary that is prepared to undermine some of the old myths: controversial feminist academics like Jane Schaberg and Mary Daly, for example, or authors of novels on Mary such as Michèle Roberts. I once introduced Dutch feminist Els Maeckelberghe’s Desperately Seeking Mary to a group of Catholic deacons in training; it so upset them that they refused to engage with it. I wasn’t invited back to speak the next year! I am by no means averse to upsetting the status quo. So why was I so disappointed with The Testament of Mary? Continue reading

Join the team!

We are looking for first year, second year, and third students to join our blog team at Point Zero. These exciting extra-curricular roles are ideally suited to students who are considering careers in writing, journalism, or publishing or who simply have a passion for words and literature. The team, working under the guidance of our academic blog team (Dr Janine Bradbury, Dr Alex Beaumont, and Dr Adam Smith) will meet several times over the year to curate content and there will be an expectation that you will be prepared to be a regular and reliable contributor to this site.

Please email Dr Alex Beaumont (a.beaumont@yorksj.ac.uk) to express an interest by Wednesday of Week 2 (27th September 2017) if you would like to join us!

Open call for contributions: Autumn Semester 2017-18

This semester we are issuing an open call for contributions to Point Zero that fall under the broad theme of ‘global literature’. We are especially interested in:

  • book reviews
  • pieces by study abroad/returning study abroad students

Please send your submissions of no more than 1000 words to Janine Bradbury (j.bradbury@yorksj.ac.uk). We are unable to publish all submissions, and submissions may be subject to minor editing for length and tone. We will be accepting submissions until Week 12 of Semester 1.

The YSJU Big Summer Read: Mary Rewrites Jesus of Nazareth

This summer, the York St John Literature programme invited students and staff to read and respond to Colm Tóibín’s 2012 novella The Testament of Mary, a study of the mother of Jesus of Nazareth as she comes to terms with her son’s crucifixion at hands of the Roman Empire. Building upon Adam’s post yesterday, here Nicoletta Peddis explores the power of testament to subvert and undermine our perception of  a major biblical character.


By Nicoletta Peddis

Testament (n.) late 13c.: “last will disposing of property,” from Latin testamentum “a last will, publication of a will,” from testari “make a will, be witness to,” from testis “witness.” Used in reference to the two divisions of the Bible (early 14c) (…) subsequently was interpreted as Christ’s “last will.” (from Online Etymology Dictionary).

In the Gospels, the Virgin Mary is the personification of grace and suffering, the mater dolorosa who is largely voiceless. We know little about her, except for her virginity and her grief. Colm Tóibín’s short novel The Testament of Mary gives voice to Mary, subverting the traditional representation of Jesus’s mother and at the same time expanding the definition of the term testament. The Testament of Mary is her giving witness to, her attestation; “I was there,” she says. The fictional portrait that Tóibín creates of Mary breaks with tradition to deepen her humanity and to bring her down to earth, trying to understand her as a suffering woman and as a mother afflicted with a difficult son. Continue reading

The YSJU Big Summer Read: Gospel, Testimony or Testament?

This summer, the York St John Literature programme invited students and staff to read and respond to Colm Tóibín’s 2012 novella The Testament of Mary, a study of the mother of Jesus of Nazareth as she comes to terms with her son’s crucifixion at hands of the Roman Empire. In today’s post, Adam asks: Why is it called a ‘Testament’ anyway?


 

By Dr Adam James Smith

Much as Margaret Atwood’s 2008 novella The Penelopiad relished the opportunity to give voice to a woman too often left silent despite her centrality to both her myth of original and subsequent literary culture, Colm Tóibín clearly delights in offering centre stage to a woman without whom there would be no New Testament. Defined and iconicized as the Mother of Christ, Mary is most often understood through her maternal relationship to the son of God, rather than as an individual in her own right. Continue reading

Opportunity with Valley Press

The ‘readers group’ at Valley Press is  recruiting new members to look at submissions via email. If you join, every week (ish) you will be sent poetry and novels that Valley Press are considering publishing – totally free of charge! All you have to do is read through them – whichever ones you choose, and totally at your leisure – and then send us your thoughts.

This would be fantastic experience for a literature student. To join, email Submissions Coordinator Tess and let her know.

Photo Gallery: Literature and Creative Writing Celebration Evening

The Literature and Creative Writing teams wish their graduating students of 2017 all the very best for the future!

On 26th May, the Literature and Creative Writing programmes hosted a celebration evening for their graduating students.

The evening featured speeches by Subject Directors Abi Curtis (Creative Writing) and Anne-Marie Evans (Literature), YSJU alumna and editor of Aesthetica magazine Cherie Frederico, and award-winning students from the class of 2017.

For a full gallery of images follow the ‘continue reading’ link below:

 

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